Arabic Class

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Word of the day: إمرأة (‘imra’a, woman)

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The word of the day is إمرأة (‘imra’a) meaning “woman”.

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Written by klaasvanschelven

February 5, 2008 at 7:01 am

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Word of the day: طبخ (Tabagha, to cook)

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طبخ (Tabagha) means to cook.

Cook (noun) in Hebrew is טבח (tabagh). Note that the ט (tet) corresponds with the ط (Taa). (The ت usually corresponds with the ת, tav).

However, the Hebrew ח (chet) is usually reflected by an Arabic ح, not خ. The Hebrew counterpart of the خ is usually the כ.

Written by klaasvanschelven

February 4, 2008 at 5:31 pm

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Verbs in Arabic – Past Tense – Exercise

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Translate the following sentences in English. Most vocabulary can be found on this site.

1) دَرَسْتُ في المدرسة

2) محمد أحب الإنترنت

3) سافَرَتْ لالقدس

4) ولدتُ في دمشق

5) أجابتُ المدرس

Written by klaasvanschelven

February 4, 2008 at 5:22 pm

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Verbs in Arabic – Past Tense – Pronoun Sentences

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Pronouns (“I”, “you”, etc.) are usually left implicit in Arabic when a verb is present. They may, however, be added for emphasis.

Examples:
درست (darastu): I studied

ولدت (wulidati): You (f) where born

سافر (saafara): He studied

In none of these examples is there an explicit pronoun. However, a pronoun may be added for extra emphasis.

أنت درست (‘anaa darastu): I studied

Written by klaasvanschelven

February 3, 2008 at 9:16 am

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Word of the day: أمس (‘ams, “yesterday”)

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Now that we’re dealing with the past tense, let’s look at some words that would indicate when in the past an action took place.

أمس (‘ams): yesterday

Written by klaasvanschelven

February 3, 2008 at 9:15 am

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Verbs in Arabic – Past Tense – The Table

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Haven given somewhat of an overview of the verb in general, it’s time to jump in.

The first thing you’ll have to do is learn the actual endings by hart. Take note that I’ve placed them in the traditional Arabic order here, starting with third person (“he” / “she” / “they”) and moving down to the first person. For the traditional English ordering, see previous posts (singular and plural). The table is given with the word درس (darasa, “to study”).

دَرَسَ (darasa)
he studied
دَرَسوا (darasuu)
they (m) studied
دَرَسَتْ (darasat)
she studied
دَرَسْنَ (darasna)
they (f) studied
دَرَسْتَ (darasta)
you (sing. masc.) studied
دَرَسْتُمْ (darastum)
you (plural. masc.) studied
دَرَسْتِ (darasti)
you (sing. fem.) studied
دَرَسْتُنَّ (darastunna)
you (plural. fem.) studied
دَرَسْتُ (darastu)
I studied
دَرَسْنا (darasnaa)
we studied

Written by klaasvanschelven

February 2, 2008 at 3:44 pm

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Verbs in Arabic – the beginning of an overview

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Having a good feeling of how the verbs work in Arabic has eluded me for almost a year now. Time to end that and dive into the subject for real. Again, as always, I’m not an expert in Arabic – so please correct me if you see any mistakes and don’t rely on this information too much.

There are only two tenses: present and past tense. Pretty much all shapes of the words can be made out of two stems per verb: one for the past tense, and one for the present tense. Usually, both of these stems are given when a word is given – on this site I’ve given only the past tense stem so far and will give both from now on. Starting with explaining the past tense seems to be the rule – presumably because it’s easier.

There is no infinitive. The stem of a verb is the same version as singular male. It is always this stem that is given in word lists. So “to study” is given as, درس (darasa), which really means “he studied”.

There is also something with groups of verbs – but it is as of yet unclear to me if knowledge of those is actually required or is just a help later on when things get more complicated. An example is the fact that درس (darasa), “to study”, is related to درّس (darrasa, “to teach”). I’ll look in to it more and dedicate a separate post to it.

Also, the plural of things or abstracts uses the female versions of the verb in the singular shape. Just keep it in mind for now, and more on that later.

Written by klaasvanschelven

February 2, 2008 at 10:47 am

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